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Nkosohene Speech

 

2014 Kuntu Nkosohen Report:

 

I returned to Kuntu in December, in time for the Kuntu AyerYe festival.  I delayed my annual visit to Kuntu because of a back problem that made it difficult for me to walk.  No need to worry, my self-appointed care-givers, Hannah Osam-Pinankoh, Robert Ntisful and Janet Intsiful, made sure that I had no problems.

 

My brief stay was exciting and successful.  The AyerYe festival began with Nana Kwesi Brebo III, chief of Kuntu, commissioning the new Kuntu community nurse clinic and nurse quarters.  Although the clinic was not fully supplied, the nurses, Agnes Duedu and Lilian Puplampu, moved in and opened the clinic for business.  The clinic was built by the Mfantsemann Assembly but will be managed by a village committee chaired by Queen Mother, Nana Obo Montoa II.  Villagers use their national heath insurance cards for payment. 

 

We then marched to the new durbar grounds.  The pavilions were a gift from Professor W.O. Ellis, vice chancellor of Kwame Nkruma University of Science and Technology, a son of Kuntu.

 

The AyerYe festival is celebrated with drumming and dancing.  Each clan in the village is represented by a captain in the Asofo drum company of Kuntu.   This year the Nsona family (not royal) installed a new Asofo Akyire, woman captain, with a parade of drumming and dancing. 

 

The festival included costumed dancers dancing through the village.

 

The highlight was the parade of chiefs. Nana Brebo and Queen Mother Nana Montoa, were paraded through the village on palaquins.  There was more dancing followed by speeches.  For a moment, I forgot myself and tried to join in the dancing.  My caretakers were worried and brought my cane but I decided it best to sit down.  Nana Brebo welcomed everyone to the festival and I had to give a short speech.

 

After the festival I met with about 40 Nkosohen scholars.  All scholars were not in the village because SHS are boarding schools and classes were in session.   I heard their aspirations for more education.  We are committed to help all SHS scholars and are supporting post-SHS scholars as finances permit.  Before leaving, I also met with the scholar parents.